Cassandra Complex in the Apollo World: The Plight of the INFP

More psychology that’s rooted in Greek myths.

Scherezade's Labyrinth

Yesterday, was interesting because I learned something new. Well, it’s been around for years but it’s new to me. First, I want to tell you about me and discussions.

I like to have meaningful discussions, trade information back and forth, but I loathe arguing. I can’t stand it, and will shut down if backed into a corner. If I’m imprisoned in said corner, then I go for the jugular. It’s not pretty. If you send for me, best believe you’re going to get Me. Why am I like this? Because growing up, I had to keep my opinions to myself, even when that person was wrong. It was rude to correct an adult. But what if they were wrong? I wasn’t flaunting my intelligence, but I was more on the lines of helping them out.

When in school, I kept my opinions to myself for fear of back lash from…

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How our native language shapes our grammar

This video shows that there is a structure to the formation of sentences and that all languages follow it. There are many ways to organise a sentence but they all contain the same elements. This is even true when translated to hand gestures to explain a picture when the person doesn’t know a sign language.

Hope you enjoy watching

Angela

Aristotle Valaoritis 1824-1879 Lefkadian Poet

https://greatestgreeks.wordpress.com/2018/10/15/aristotelis-valaoritis/

This Reblog goes into great detail about the life of the man Aristotle Valaoritis Lefkadian National Library

Aristotle Valaoritis Lefkadian National Library
Aristotle Valaoritis National Library
Aristotle Valaoritis National Library

who wrote the Greek national anthem. He also wrote many poems. If you want to see where he born Aristotle Valaoritis birth plaque

Aristotle Valaoritis birth plaque

there is this plaque on the wall in Lefkás town commemorating the spot. He later lived on the island of Madouri Madouri by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

Madouri by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

near Lefkás you will find a shrine dedicated to him. Aristotle Valaoritis Shrine by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

Aristotle Valaoritis shrine by Wilhelm Dörpfeld
Aristotle Valaoritis shrine

His family still live in the area and are going to stay there forever. Even Aristotle Onassis with all his money and charm couldn’t persuade them to sell their land. This is what Wikipedia has to say about the matter. Aristotle Valaoritis

He also has a statue dedicated to himself with a lengthy description in Lefkás town. Aristotle Valaoritis statue

Aristotle Valaoritis statue
Aristotle Valaoritis tomb, Lefkás Town
Aristotle Valaoritis tomb, Lefkás Town
Angelos Sikelianos poem on Aristotle Valaoritis tomb
Angelos Sikelianos poem on Aristotle Valaoritis tomb

This is the first of my series of posts on famous Greek but mainly Lefkádian poets. With a bonus post on Sappho from Sententiae Ancientae.

C F Cavafy,

Angelos Sikelianos,

Lefkadia Hearn,

George Seferis

C G Karyotakis

Ioannis (Nanos) Valaoritis

Odysseus Elytis

Andreas Emberikos

Kostis Palamas

Ioannis Zampelios

Spiridon Zampelios

Other series include Greek authors, Painters, Rural villages in Lefkás and Foreigners who have become interested and or benefited Greece in some ways. These can all be found here Series links.

Do you have any favourite poets? Drop me a line so we can discuss in the comments.

Hope your enjoying yourself,

Angela

How learning foreign languages enables connection

This video contains the quote from Nelson Mandela where if you speak to a person in a language they understand it goes to there head but if you speak to them in their language it goes to their heart. This is so very true of the Greek people and inside the speaker Louka will detail his journey to connect with his heritage but also the indigenous people of Australia. He will empower you to learn a language for yourself if only to keep your brain healthy and stop neurodegenerative diseases from taking hold and destroying all that you hold dear.

Wishing you all well.

Angela

Reasons for and against monetisation

I watched this video and she brings up some amazing points. These are things we all know and we all do yet we powerless to prevent them. It’s autonomy that we all crave and control. The ability to decide for ourselves what we are going to do when, how and also why. We can all live richer lives but without the riches that we think we need to do so. She draws upon Ancient wisdom but also the knowledge we learn growing up and foolishly discard as being outdated. We need money but not as much as we think. It’s about learning that self discipline and if we cannot planning accordingly so that we never run out of money.

This is the first video that deals with making money and my issues with this :-

How to make money from blogging

Best wishes

Angela

The enjoyment of reading

I’ve just been reading the BFG to myself in Greek and this makes me quite happy that I can follow what is happening in the story. I don’t quite get all of it yet but if I continue I should be a lot better than when I started.

The first time I tried to read this book I was concentrating far too much on what I didn’t know so I didn’t understand the story at all. I know the story and I’ve seen various film adaptations but to actually read the original is quite different. I also referred to the English version far too much so I lost the flow as they don’t always correlate. What I do hate in writing though is the justification of words to fit in columns that results in lots of hyphens. It’s difficult enough to read the words and to have them split across 2 lines is just plain irritating. How am I supposed to read it out loud and put the emphasis on the correct part if I don’t even know what the word is?

This is The negative side of trying to learn to read in a foreign language.

Wishing you all the happiness in the world.

Angela

Word origins

Now the origins of words is a subject that I love dearly so I’m very grateful when a native Greek not only teaches me many but also provides the translations for me in my native language. So very useful and helpful to have these around.

I didn’t realize until watching the videos a second time just how many words had entered from French, Italian and Turkish. French as I’m learning was such a popular language in Europe and in Russia in the 18th. It was the lingua Franca or universal language of its day.

I do have an affinity for certain words and I did wonder when going into a bakers why a particular type of bread was mia fragiola parakalo (one loaf of fragiola bread please). Now I know it’s a word of Turkish origin as it does stick out from the rest of the language. As does karpousia or watermelons. One of the very first words I learnt and it’s not really even Greek!!!!

Here is the first video in the series

Basic Greek

This the second video in the series

The effect Greek has had on English

Wishing you all luck in your language adventures

Angela

The influence Greek has had on the English language etc

Now I have previously commented lots on the many things contained within this video so I thought for a change you would like to see a Greek talk about his own language and history. He goes into much greater depth about everything than I ever could. Pronunciation is the biggest factor here. Its useful for those learning Romance languages and Russian too as there all connected.

Here is the link to the first video in this series if you missed it.

Basic Greek

This is the third in the series in case you wish to jump ahead.

More complex Greek

Enjoy the bounty contained within.

Angela

Basic Greek for those that are unfamiliar

I remember doing posts like this on YouTube in my early days but they were so bad that I deleted them after a couple of years. They are still in Facebook ‘s memory bank though so when that the day turns up in memories I get reminded of the progress I have made.

Dimitri, the presenter does these videos so much better than I could ever do and with more subtitles as they are very difficult to synchronise.

In case you are wondering why I am promoting these videos it’s to show the Greek language in the best possible way since who better than a native speaker in his home country. I most certainly couldn’t do a better job. It shows the different levels of understanding that are present as you progress in your language learning journey. I hope you all find them informative like I have.

As this is the first video in the series there are 2 to follow and if you wish to just watch them without my commentary here they are :-

The effect of English on Greek

More complex Greek

Best wishes

Angela