Eight Greek inscriptions

Eight Greek inscriptions

https://scientificgems.wordpress.com/2019/08/10/eight-greek-inscriptions/
— Read on scientificgems.wordpress.com/2019/08/10/eight-greek-inscriptions/

Here is some Greek phrases to analyse while I address some personal issues that prevent me from actively blogging at the moment.

Best wishes

Angela

The First Line

This is a movie on Netflix about the Parthenon marbles. They were taken by Lord Elgin in the 18th century for safe keeping in the British Museum. This is the attempt by some Greek lawyers to get them back. It has lots of Greek conversation on which to practice which is very useful for me. I hope you all enjoy the film as much as I did.

Best wishes

Angela

Greek Grammar – parts of speech

Since grammar is not my strong suit but it is crucial to be able to communicate correctly I have decided to share some videos from a lady who is very good at demonstrating her ability to teach others.

The conversation series

50 verbs in Greek

100 common phrases in Athenian Greek

How to have a basic conversation in Greek with common phrases

My previous work

Series links

My published books

Best wishes

Angela

50 verbs in Greek

I like the fact that Lina explains in great detail the fact that lots of words in Greek have several meanings. I’m not a great talker so she does the job amply for me.

Part of my conversation series

100 common phrases in Athenian Greek

How to have a basic conversation in Greek with common phrases

For my other work see here

Series links

My published books

Best wishes

Angela

100 common phrases in Athenian Greek

This lady is very easy to understand, she explains herself well and there is the written examples of the phrases she is teaching you in English and Greek.

Compare this to my version How to have a basic conversation in Greek with common phrases and you will notice differences because island Greek is simpler and abbreviated. It’s also not as correct but still gets the message across. The main things I can think of is that sit down καθίστε η κάτσε κάτω and I don’t know δεν ξέρω (the Lefkas version doesn’t emphasis the separate words and blends them together) are said differently.

Best wishes

Angela

Patrick Leigh Fermor British author 1915-2011

A British author who went to school at the Kings School Canterbury, was a scholar, polyglot and a soldier. He traveled extensively in Greece and Europe becoming friends with Lawrence Durrell. He is referenced by Lawrence in Bitter Lemons which is Lawrence’s book on Cyprus.

He also had quite an effect on Ian Fleming and is extensively quoted in his book Live and Let Die due to his experience of the Caribbean and the fact he liked to live in monasteries.

He has quite the back catalogue of books to get through as he had the crazy idea to walk all the way from England to Greece. It’s serialised in his books since there is such a lot of material. I have one Roumeli- Travels in Northern Greece. Roumeli is an old name for northern Greece that is seldom used these days. He is perhaps the only man that I know of that has referred to the area by such a term.

I’m currently reading the above book and it’s a good read. It has lots of snippets of the Greek language and it shows Greece just as it was being discovered by the rest of Western Europe in the 1960’s. It was a time of great change and modernisation. It was also a time of revolution. He mentions the customs and traditions that may not be still present. I find it very informative and it’s a historical document. He does however reference his previous book Mani a lot which I haven’t got yet and you can tell he was a journalist as it’s written as a travelogue with pieces of real life interaction along with book recommendations and information about the people or history of a place.

On his gravestone is a quote from C F Cavafy and it says “In addition, he was the best of all things, Hellenic.”

Patrick Leigh Fermor

Part of foreigners with an interest in Greece series.

Series links

Best wishes

Angela

Xenofontas Gregoris 1902-1988 Lefkádian doctor

Xenofontas Gregoris Lefkádian doctor
Xenofontas Gregoris Lefkádian doctor

He is commemorated on the island by not only having the above statue but by having the new hospital named after him. This is quite something and we had the current prime minster of Greece Alexis Tsipras over to open it.

Xenofontas fought against the Nazis and was against the junta that later took place in Greece. So he was extremely patriotic but google doesn’t seem to think he exists.

Best wishes

Angela

Other museums in Lefkás

Since I have covered all of the museums that are in Lefkás town I though I would spread the net a little further to encompass the rest of the island. Here I have to thank tourist websites for the information especially GoLefkas.gr It has Greek and English versions. This is due to the fact that neither me nor my husband drive. (Long story)

The church museum that is housed at Faneromeni Monastery and is mentioned here.Saints associated with Lefkás, their churches and shrines. Also has a maritime museum and zoo. It’s located about 3km outside of Lefkás town. For the festival which is on Monday 17th June this year, there is a huge market there and all the visit it after being blessed. It is one of many bank holidays which always occur on the actual day instead of the nearest Monday.

Folklore museum Sfakiotes (North Lefkás mountains) is a place dedicated to crafts that took place on Lefkás when it was isolated before the modern era of communication and travel. It’s very much a community place that showcases the education of the past. It celebrates the life Antreas Lazaris who was awarded by the Academy of Athens in 2013 for his extensive contribution to folkloristic history in Lefkás and to which a lot of the items used to belong to. There is also a room dedicated to Hristos Katapodis who had amassed a needlework collection and a costume room.

Radio, Phonograph and Gramophone museum Karya. (Central Lefkás mountains) This contains lots of the above equipment for listening to music. It was founded in 2015.

“Apollon” Music and Literature club Karya. This was founded in 1956 and until recently had a music school (2000) and put on theatre productions (1996). However they do still put on a 3 day representation of a rural wedding and a ‘Riganda’ festival. It has lots of documents from its operations in the past and costumes.

The museum itself was founded in 2012 to preserve Lefkádian traditions. It is in the old primary school and although it’s free you have to arrange before hand for it to be open.

Folklore museum Karya. Started in 2017 also in the Primary school, it contains more clothes, tools and everything else that was needed for life in the olden days.

Heritage museum Karya. This is the museum dedicated to the karsaniko stitch that is unique to Lefkádian embroidery.

Meli 51 Palakatouna/Neohori. (South central mountains Lefkás) This is a museum created in 2016 dedicated to bee keeping. It is however temporarily unavailable to the public.

Lefkáditiki Winery Syros. (South mountains Lefkás) This is a winery with a museum attached to it that tells you a bit about the process of wine making.

“Fabbrica” Olive oil museum Syvota, which is a tiny village at the bottom of the island. It shows the processes necessary for the production of Olive oil. It also has a tasting space for local products.

Lygia Sea museum (coastal central Lefkás) This is located in the primary school so you have to arrange with them when to visit. It was started in 1991 by pupils to encourage development of knowledge about all creatures that have lived or currently live in the sea.

The whale fin museum in Kastos which is a little tiny island that you can reach on a trip boat,

Best wishes

Angela

The battle of Actium

This was a famous battle between Cleopatra, Marc Antony and Octavian. There are details about this famous battle in the Archeological museum In Lefkás Town. There are also plenty of details here on Wikipedia Battle of Actium.

I can’t add anything there that isn’t already there since it was so long ago. I just need to add it for completion of the history of the area. Since there is also nothing to see or record in any way I can’t even give you any pictures.

Best wishes

Angela

Santa Maura fort Lefkás

A 14th century castle built by John Orsini to defend the island against the numerous invaders who have fought to control the island since the buildings’ creation – Venetians, Ottoman Empire, French, British.

The castle has passed through many hands to belong to the state now. You can visit but it’s closed on Tuesdays.

It is however a shadow of its former self being a collection of ruins along with the nearby church but events sometimes take place here. This is the reason why Battle for Santa Maura.

The army was based here and some of the honourable mentions from the Famous Lefkadians post were born here.

I have only been here once and it was on a day that it was closed so there no pictures for me to show.

Best wishes

Angela

Apostolos (Lakis) Santas Greek soldier 1922-2012

His family come from Lefkás while he was born in Patras. They put this gravestone up in front of a children’s playground which carries his name. The area is known as Apostolos Santas square. They also have a big sewing shop in town if I’m correct here since it’s an unusual surname.

He took down the German flag from the Acropolis on 30th May 1941 which is what it says on the gravestone.

Big Wikipedia article on him Apostolos Santas.

Best wishes

Angela

Maria Callas soprano opera singer 1923-1977

She was a very famous Greek from America who fell in love with a fellow Greek who was charming, charismatic, ambitious and basically your stereotypical self made man. He got what he wanted and dictated the terms of the relationship as you would expect for a man in his position and of the time and culture he came from. She was a delicate flower who just wanted to sing but she didn’t have the means by herself so she needed a patron. Step forward Aristotle Onassis who provided the means for her to do so. They also had a very famous relationship while she was married to her husband Giovanni Batista, Onassis being married to his first Tina, together Maria and Onassis had a child Homer who subsequently died and the pairing continued until he got married to Jackie Kennedy.

She turned up for the Festivals held in Lefkás in 1964 so there are pictures of her in the Gramophone museum Lefkás town. There are also details of her life here Skorpios.

Wikipedia articleMaria Callas

Do you have any notable opera singers from your country?

Best wishes

Angela

Aristotle Onassis Greek shipping magnate 1906-1975

This is the statue dedicated to Aristotle Socrates Onassis that is on the Nidri harbourside. This is across the water from the island Scorpios that he bought from the Greek government and lived with Jackie Onassis Kennedy. Most people know the story of his life and for those that are unfamiliar here is the Wikipedia article Aristotle Onassis and there are 2 biographies on him. I’ve read them both, Ari and Nemesis. He is buried on the island of Scorpios but no one can get anywhere near it when the now owner a Russian billionaire is in residence. The only people allowed on the island are workers to create a super luxury resort which has been talked about in the local press but it’s still very secretive the goings on. However you can learn some more about him in this article Skorpios.

There are pictures of his time on the island in the Gramophone museum Lefkás town.

Any infamous people like this from your country?

Best wishes

Angela

Ioanian school of philosophy

Ioanian school of philosophy

This is mainly concerned with nature as they studied the physical world hence they are also called physicalists and cosmologists. This is a very old field of thought that was uniquely Greek. It’s amply explained by the Wikipedia article and I can’t really add anything to it since it’s so well established already. I sometimes include things just to make you aware of them and for completeness. As far as I know there is no input from anyone outside of Athens since it was so long ago.

Best wishes

Angela

Andreas Kalvos Greek poet 1792-1869

He was a major part of the Heptanese school of literature along with his fellow Zakynthoan Dionysios Solomos However the 2 never met and there is also no known picture of Andreas Kalvos.

He was a wayward soul hence he wasn’t recognised in his hometown and country until much later. He traveled widely through Greece and Europe having many affairs, marrying a couple of times and producing a couple although they often died shortly afterwards. Thus his life was full of sadness which powered his poetry.

He also taught Italian and Greek to help finance his restless nature. His become disgruntled with his family and his patron which led to his inability to settle anywhere for any length of time. He was constantly moving in search of something he couldn’t quite get.

Since he died in England it wasn’t until 1960 when George Seferis was the Greek ambassador that he arranged for the body of Andreas Kalvos to be returned to his native Zakynthos.

He is part of my series on Greek poets.

For a look at my other work see here Series links.

Best wishes

Angela

Dionysios Solomos Greek poet 1798-1857

Dionysios Solomos introducing a George Seferis chapter
Dionysios Solomos introducing a George Seferis chapter

He is considered the principal poet of the Heptanese school of poetry of which he was part of yet this set contained amongst others Aristotle Valaoritis, Ioannis Zampelios Spiridon Zampelios and Andreas Kalvos.

The reasoning for this is that Dionysios’s education on Zakynthos had been in Classical Greek and when he lived in Italy, Italian. When he tried to write in a more modern form (Dimotiki) it was extremely difficult for him as there were no poems to act as a reference since they were previously in Katharevousa. Therefore, he had to create a whole catalogue by himself.

It was himself that started the poetic revolution that questioned what version of the Greek language that people write in compared with how they talk. In typical Greek fashion this was only resolved in the 1970’s. So for approx 150 years they were unable to decide which should be the official versions.

Even Byron perhaps did not have that much effect on the Greek people although he did influence Dionysios. As usual this is not always corroborated by all the sites I have read but since people of similiar minds all tend to congregate in the same place he probably did have have an effect on him.

For perhaps a more authentic take and some clarity read this Dionysios Solomos.

He is part of my series on Greek poets.

Aristotle Valaoritis

Ioannis Zampelios

Spiridon Zampelios

Andreas Kalvos

For a look at my other work see here Series links.

Best wishes

Angela

The 10+1 Most Important Figures of Greek Independence | GreekReporter.com

Greek people had been enslaved for many centuries and the revolution was one of the most significant historic events in modern Greek history.
— Read on greece.greekreporter.com/2015/03/25/the-10-most-important-figures-of-greek-independence/

This is a Greek view of their struggle for independence so it might be slightly biased.

Best wishes

Angela

Heptanese school of literature

Heptanese School of literature.

This was the school of literature that Aristotle Valaoritis belonged to as well as Ioannis Zampelios who are very famous Lefkádian poets. Andreas Kalvos and Dionysios Solomos are in there too. The articles written about this school will tend to focus on people known to that locality ie you come across ones written from the view of a person from Zakynthos as Dionysios Solomos was from there and this one is written from the perspective of a Lefkadian since that’s where I am. Hence I mentioned Valaoritis first where usually you would see a note about pre Solomos, Solomos, and post Solomos poets.

The Heptanese school is characterised by a love of nature, freedom and homeland with reference to the role that religion played in their lives. It was also folkloreish in content and often romantized life in a way only poetry can taking inspiration from Italy. They were written in Dimotiki or Demotic as apposed to Katharevousa which is to say its written in the common Greek that was spoken as opposed to the posher, purist form which was a simplication of Ancient Greek that was used for formal, business occasions.

As I have already written ample amounts about the Lefkadian poets and I have never been to Zakynthos I can’t tell you much more as that’s the real centre of this particular movement.

For information on the other schools of thought see here

  • Series links contains the rest of my work like all of the poets mentioned above and more.
  • Best wishes

    Angela

    Brain, Mouth and Me

    Brain, Mouth and me have known each other a long time but we have a difficult relationship. Brain likes to learn everything in the entire world and then have Mouth recite it to all and sundry wherever possible. This creates problems for me as that’s not how you communicate with people or connect with them. It’s almost a verbal barrage of information that is nonstop and only relents when there is no more information to impart. This can take a long time and usually is stopped by them leaving as the event has finished.

    The other scenario that happens is where Brain is feeling remorseful for the above situation so refuses to give Mouth any words. Even if the day has been relaxed and I have done exactly as Brain and I wanted, Brain decides No! Yes I understand what you asked, meant, what I need to say in reply to you but can Brain release those words to Mouth? Oh No!

    It’s highly embarrassing after 13 years to still be unable to say “τι θα θέλατε να πιείτε?” Μια Μπύρα Παρακαλω, “μικρο η μεγάλα?”, μικρο ευχαριστώ, “τι θέλις να φάε?” θέλω ένα τσιπούρα σημερα, etc.

    Thanks Brain for causing all this distress for Me by not allowing Mouth to say What would you like to drink?, A beer please, Small or Large?, Small please, What do you want to eat?, I want a sea bream today, etc

    It’s not a lot to ask but to have all these words at your command yet the inability to use any of them is soul destroying.

    Have you experienced this before and if so how have you overcome this?

    Best wishes

    Angela