Another SA reblog because I couldn’t help it

http://sententiaeantiquae.com/2019/04/08/on-reading-and-writing-for-pleasure/

I love reading these posts about the Ancient Greek literature as you get the real deal. It’s not lost any authenticity due to translation so it’s the closest you can get to being in Ancient Greece itself.

Have you read any works of literature in the original language?

Best wishes

Angela

To be like everyone else or not? – Reblog

https://quirkydragon.wordpress.com/2019/04/08/to-be-or-not-to-be-mainstream/

This is another blogger who has some quality posts to read. This is again long but worthy of your attention when you get the time.

I’ve only just come across this blogger but I’m sure there will be many more posts that will interest me in the future.

The difference between written and spoken language

http://sententiaeantiquae.com/2019/04/07/the-difference-between-dialogues-and-letters/

I rather liked this post because while I can be quite pedantic when it comes to written language; I’m not always quite so when it comes to speech. I can of course be informal in writing and formal in speech if the occasion commands it.

Do you have any such conventions in your language?

Best wishes

Angela

Pammakristos (Greek autism charity)

This is the website that deals with severely autistic children in Greece which helps lots of children to lead better lives. People are born, live and die with autism. It gets better as you get older as you learning coping strategies and become more independent but the ability to revert when tired, ill, overwhelmed, stressed etc remains.
I’m sorry that the website is in Greek and there is no English equivalent hence it goes through Google Translate here but they can’t do everything.
I found this quite an interesting read yesterday. Sorry for the quality.

Best wishes

Angela

Ελευθείρα!(Freedom)

https://www.pappaspost.com/freedom-enduring-greek-ideal-on-greek-independence-day/

For those of you that don’t know about Greek Independence Day I thought I would share a post to illuminate you on this issue. This subject tends to get missed out from history classes. I love history and have therefore researched it quite a lot but it wasn’t until I really started to learn the language and the culture from visiting that I started to understand its importance. I have written many posts about Greek language, culture and history on my other blog athenaminerva7@wordpress.com and now I’m continuing this trend on here. I’m trying to be more focused with the personal and autistic posts on my first blog and the Greek related posts on here.

I have also neglected to post a schedule as I try to post during the week and have a break during the weekend but it appears that I’m reaching far more people by posting every day. Once again Cristian Mihai is proving he knows his onions not just with his “just punch the damn keys”. Getting your posts in front of more eye balls and keeping your name in people’s mind is vitally important. When you gain traction, capitalise on it as it’s so very difficult to regain growth if you have slacked off for whatever reason. I know this is tough but we love it and that’s why we do it.

How do you overcome your struggles with productivity?

Wishing you all well

Angela

The music of Ancient Greece

https://aeon.co/videos/music-was-ubiquitous-in-ancient-greece-now-we-can-hear-how-it-actually-sounded

Since today is Greek Independence Day I thought I would share a post about the importance of music in Greek history.

For a taste of more modern Greek music see here Rebetika.

Have you any stories to share about what is important in your culture?

Best wishes

Angela

C F Cavafy Greek poet (1863-1933)

Each of these poems that I’m sharing with you today is quite evocative in there language. From the brevity of life, the restlessness of youth, the pretense that some of us think we need to fit in and finally the pain of dating. These are struggles we have all been through at some point. Human nature doesn’t change despite our attitudes being modified, our lives changing beyond all recognition due to technology and the world around us morphing due to the effects of our industry.

Here is a Greek view on the subject C F Cavafy and here is the Wikipedia article on this gentleman C P Cavafy. It’s good to compare and contrast different viewpoints. It helps to create a more balanced view.

  • This is the second post on my series of famous Greek but mainly Lefkádian poets and authors. Aristotle Valaoritis ,
  • Angelos Sikelianos
  • Lefkadia Hearn
  • George Seferis
  • C G Karyotakis
  • Ioannis (Nanos) Valaoritis
  • Odysseus Elytis
  • Andreas Emberikos
  • Here is a bonus post by Sententiae Ancientae on Sappho.
  • Other series include Greek Authors, Musicians, Famous Greeks, Rural Villages in Lefkás and Foreigners who have become interested and or benefited Greece in some ways. All the links can be found here Series links.

    Do you have a favourite poet and would you like to share with me?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    Brexit: The uncivil war

    In a follow up article to the one I previously wrote on Brexit and Grexit; I have just watched Brexit: The uncivil war. It’s a brilliant show which shows exactly how Brexit happened.

    I love Benedict Cumberbatch as he is such a talented actor. I adore the erudite way he speaks and acts. His intellect is phenomenal. No matter his role he is utterly convincing.

    Now having learnt about Brexit from both sides, what is your opinion on the matter?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    Finding your voice

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/kindle-dbs/author/ref=dbs_P_W_auth?_encoding=UTF8&author=Angela%20Goodwin&searchAlias=digital-text&asin=B01G9629BG

    This is something that is very difficult to do as we all have things we want to say or we want others to know about ourselves. Modulating our needs with our wants and desires is a tricky balancing act especially when you throw in the rules of society. These vary according to your age, status, religion, the era your living in, country you were born in but also the country your now living in as that can differ greatly. Successive governments can change the ruling style of a country too so the regime you were born into is not the way that is now in operation. All of these requirements can make it nigh on impossible to discover yourself if your having to follow such restrictive regulations. It is precisely these environments that test the mettle of a population and the cream will rise to the top to overcome dictatorial rule. It is often women who fight their oppressors in the strongest way possible.

    Women have it hardest in life but are able to make the most of adversity as matriarchal societies are more stable than there patriarchal counterparts. Women value peace and family far more than men do. We are thankfully coming into a time when women are being respected for their contributions finally. Women are taking their place in the world as we do make up a significant portion of the workforce. We are more than capable of running governments and countries. I believe the world will be a far better place now that women are in control of world economies as it will be a much more prosperous place for all concerned.

    Do you have any stories about how women have improved your life?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    On things you know but don’t realise

    There are lots of words around that are part Greek and part Latin. These were both the languages of scholars so it’s almost like they couldn’t decide which was better and compromised a lot of the time.

    Today I came across an article about the aurora borealis and it explained that this comes from both Greek and Latin. Aurora meaning dawn and borealis being the word for north. Hence we have the northern lights

    Another instance that is popular in today’s culture is that of polyamory. This has poli from Greek which means many here and amory which is Latin. That stands for love. So a polyamorous person loves and engages with many people. This label is an ongoing joke within the community because the scientists who come up with this monikers are so indecisive.

    However, it would make more sense if they didn’t chop and change the language these terms came from in the first place. There needs to be rules to follow but right now everything seems to be in a state of flux as everything seems permissible.

    It happens to me quite frequently that I know certain well known and familiar concepts but until it’s explicitly pointed out, the realisation is not apparent to me. It doesn’t click and you don’t get that aha moment!

    It also makes me think that children are constantly questioning everything, trying to figure out why things are the way they are but as adults we accept the status quo and just go along with our daily lives. Children have a lot of common sense as they don’t understand the social reasons for a lot of what they do. They just do things in the simplest and easiest way. We have to remember to not remove their innovative ways in the quest to teach them the ways of the world. We also have to accept that there ways may actually be better.

    Language is a good area to demonstrate this as it’s forever evolving. Us as adults try to control everything as we think we know best being more experienced and worldly wise but this is not always true. Letting go is important for true freedom from the constraints that hold us back.

    Can you come up with any examples that have shared linguistic roots? Or perhaps you have a similar scenario to share with us today?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    Comparing and contrasting Brexit (2016) and the Greek Referendum (2015)

    I’ve just been watching Inside Europe: 10 years of turmoil and it documents in its 3 programs :-

    First the immediate background leading up to the momentous decision that is Brexit,

    Second the events around the Greek financial bailouts or Grexit as some reports named it and

    Lastly the refugee crisis that came to dominate the headlines and the entirety of Europe.

    Therefore I decided to write an opinion piece as I have spent a considerable amount of time in both Greece and England over the last 10 years along with visiting places like Morocco, Canary Islands, Italy, Denmark and America.

    Brexit

    Britain leaving the European Union has been debated for a long time before we were given the chance to decide whether we still wished to be part of it. I wasn’t around when we first joined the eu but from what I have heard, there was a great debate over that too.

    I think it’s part of us being an island that makes us so insular and so reject a closer union with our neighbours.

    This video debates languages but has references to the British attitude to being closer to Europe.

    British people are notoriously cold and I believe it’s not only our weather that makes us like this but our traditions as well. This is why we are reluctant to have any closer ties to what can colloquially called “Johnny foreigner”. This is a rather outdated concept but responsible for a lot of the anti immigration feeling that led to Brexit. If you analyse the statistics you will find that it is older people and people from the heartlands of the uk who voted for Brexit. This is almost like trying to put the milk back in the bottle after you have spilled it. It can’t be done but if you try to risk contaminating the rest of the milk.

    Brexit reminds me of Pandora’s box as we have allowed all of the contents out yet in our efforts to close the box and attempt to go back to the way things were, we have left hope trapped inside.

    Nothing good can come of us returning to a place we last
    inhabited in the 1970s. The world has changed too much and we all know we were sold a pack of lies as to the benefits of Brexit. The daily news relates each new case of a business quitting because of uncertainty surrounding the rules that are going to be in place and the trade deals that will be used to help enforce these new criteria.

    Grexit

    The Greeks on the other hand are in some ways still in the 1970s as you can here the way they spoke then if you go past a cafe (kafenon) and listen to the old men chatting.

    Greece is a place that still has traditional values which can seem to some rather backward because mental health is not a buzz word nor is gender identity or trans rights. These are all good things but they are not splashed all over the media. People have common sense so they don’t need to have an oppressive stance to get across to them that these sections of the community need respect. They are private people who get on with their lives and don’t worry about the opinions of others. They don’t follow fashion as they know it changes so quickly and they don’t have the income to keep up with that.

    The Greeks are very hard working and you can find studies online which show how they work the most but this not sufficient to prosper in today’s society. You need to work in a profitable way and this is often the opposite of the humane way.

    This is why the Greeks rebelled against the austerity measures as you can only take so many cuts before its impossible to continue. They changed their government to elect members who would vote against anything more from the Germans. So understandably they were not happy that when their prime minister Alexis Tsipras gave them a referendum and they rejected it by 61% which is a lot more decisive than 52%. However their PM decided to ignore “the will of the people” as Teresa May is so fond of calling it as he needed to remain in Europe. He like all Greeks likes money and will do what is necessary to ensure a constant supply of it.

    We could do the same as the Greeks as I think they set a precedent there but no, we have Teresa May saying Brexit means Brexit means Brexit. What actually does that mean?

    Immigration

    Is it that we can’t cope with immigrants? We didn’t have the same number flooding in from Syria that the Greeks had to deal with. Admittedly we are the final destination unlike Greece being the first stop but the English are famous for being monolingual and our European counterparts are multilingual. This means we have a limited way in terms of thinking and connection. We are inflexible and not open to other avenues simply because they don’t exist for us. We cannot comprehend there way of life so they cannot integrate into ours. There will forever be a distance culturally, ethically and linguistically.

    I wrote a follow up to this and here is the link to it :- Brexit: The unholy war

    What do you all think of this situation? Please let me know by writing in the comments below.

    Best wishes

    Angela

    Aristotle Valaoritis 1824-1879 Lefkadian Poet

    https://greatestgreeks.wordpress.com/2018/10/15/aristotelis-valaoritis/

    This Reblog goes into great detail about the life of the man Aristotle Valaoritis Lefkadian National Library

    Aristotle Valaoritis Lefkadian National Library
    Aristotle Valaoritis National Library
    Aristotle Valaoritis National Library

    who wrote the Greek national anthem. He also wrote many poems. If you want to see where he born Aristotle Valaoritis birth plaque

    Aristotle Valaoritis birth plaque

    there is this plaque on the wall in Lefkás town commemorating the spot. He later lived on the island of Madouri Madouri by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

    Madouri by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

    near Lefkás you will find a shrine dedicated to him. Aristotle Valaoritis Shrine by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

    Aristotle Valaoritis shrine by Wilhelm Dörpfeld
    Aristotle Valaoritis shrine

    His family still live in the area and are going to stay there forever. Even Aristotle Onassis with all his money and charm couldn’t persuade them to sell their land. This is what Wikipedia has to say about the matter. Aristotle Valaoritis

    He also has a statue dedicated to himself with a lengthy description in Lefkás town. Aristotle Valaoritis statue

    Aristotle Valaoritis statue

    Aristotle Valaoritis tomb, Lefkás Town
    Aristotle Valaoritis tomb, Lefkás Town

    Angelos Sikelianos poem on Aristotle Valaoritis tomb
    Angelos Sikelianos poem on Aristotle Valaoritis tomb

    This is the first of my series of posts on famous Greek but mainly Lefkádian poets. With a bonus post on Sappho from Sententiae Ancientae.

    C F Cavafy,

    Angelos Sikelianos,

    Lefkadia Hearn,

    George Seferis

    C G Karyotakis

    Ioannis (Nanos) Valaoritis

    Odysseus Elytis

    Andreas Emberikos

    Kostis Palamas

    Ioannis Zampelios

    Spiridon Zampelios

    Other series include Greek authors, Painters, Rural villages in Lefkás and Foreigners who have become interested and or benefited Greece in some ways. These can all be found here Series links.

    Do you have any favourite poets? Drop me a line so we can discuss in the comments.

    Hope your enjoying yourself,

    Angela

    How learning foreign languages enables connection

    This video contains the quote from Nelson Mandela where if you speak to a person in a language they understand it goes to there head but if you speak to them in their language it goes to their heart. This is so very true of the Greek people and inside the speaker Louka will detail his journey to connect with his heritage but also the indigenous people of Australia. He will empower you to learn a language for yourself if only to keep your brain healthy and stop neurodegenerative diseases from taking hold and destroying all that you hold dear.

    Wishing you all well.

    Angela

    Literature

    I am a keen reader of books of all kinds as I love words. This makes it fitting that I also have a love of the Greek language as so many words in the English language originate from there. In a bid to help me learn all about the Greek culture I read every book and watch every movie that I can get my hands on to further my knowledge of this fascinating culture.

    To acquire this bounty it includes such classics as Zorba the Greek (book and movie), as well as Captain Corelli’s Mandolin by Louis de Bernieres (so far only the movie); and some of the vast media catalogue on the Durell’s for instance, the TV show about their lives as a family on Corfu and books like The Bitter Lemons of Cyprus by Lawrence or the well known My Family and Animals by Gerald. However, no list could be complete without also adding in more recent books like all of Victoria Hislop‘s books and to have another Greek point of view, I’m going to start on Panos Kanezis books, The Maze etc shortly.

    I can usually be found with my head stuck in a book and since I read at an astonishingly quick pace if the book is well written, I’m soon to be found in want of a person to tell them all about the book I just devoured with great relish. These are my latest interests but I do have a book on how Virginia Woolf et al fought to learn the Greek language as it was the language of the learned people and an anthology of Greek poetry from the last 2000 years as Lefkás has Sappho and the poet Aristotle Valaoritis island nearby and his shrine.

    I wish to have a balanced viewpoint of people and their cultures through time hence there are books by the English living in Corfu and various other Greek Islands from the 30’s-50s (Durell’s), some of whom could speak Greek (Lawrence in particular) but there is also Victoria Hislop who has written on many aspects of Greek life as she can also speak Greek. It helps to lend an authentic air to her stories when you know she has mixed with the locals to gain inspiration for her stories. There is nothing quite like reading a Nikos Kazantzakis novel though with the gravitas that he lends to his writing. It is truly a spectacular talent that he had as he lifted all that read his masterpieces to a higher plane of thought. There should be greater appreciation of his work outside of his native lands but if I praise him too much that means the books will go up in price and I will not be able to buy them so cheaply anymore 😉

    Best wishes

    Angela