The Stoic way to deal with the problem of Indifference in Relationships

The Problem of Indifference in Relationships

The Problem of Indifference in Relationships
— Read on beyondboundslb.co/2019/05/26/the-problem-of-indifference-in-relationships/

Stoicism is an Ancient Greek ideal that is gaining popularity at the moment. Here is a good explanation of how it relates to modern life.

Best wishes

Angela

An essay on the role of education in the future

https://aeon.co/ideas/how-much-can-we-afford-to-forget-if-we-train-machines-to-remember

As we are getting more into the 21st century the need to change our educational style is increasing.

  • No longer do we need so many of the facts that were crammed into our heads as children. We now have Google for that.
  • For the bibliographic details of our friends we have a phone.
  • To find our way from A to B we now have Sat Nav’s.
  • Calculators have replaced the need for mental arithmetic
  • Email has mostly replaced letter writing.
  • Smart watches are replacing our diaries.
  • Fit bits are monitoring our health.
  • Handsfree devices allow us to talk when we cannot use our phones.
  • Hive thermostats can control the heating in our homes.
  • Alexa can control your lighting.
  • Google assistant can control your music collection.
  • Amazon tabs can order your favourite items.
  • Siri knows far more about you than anyone else does (as does Facebook).
  • E readers are possibly replacing books.
  • Netflix are replacing the television stations.
  • Air B and B is changing travel accommodation.
  • Uber is revolutionizing travel transportation.
  • Just Eat is controlling where we get our takeaways from.
  • Cars no longer need keys for the ignition.
  • I)What else are we able to do without in order to increase the time available to ourselves for creative interests?
  • II)Are you scared by how much technology exists in our lives, it’s ability to learn and possibly to go rogue at some point?
  • III)Are we turning into mindless robots being programmed by exposure to so much media and our subsequent consumption of it?
  • IV)What does it mean to be human nowadays as we are relying more and more on technology for our every need?
  • Best wishes
  • Angela
  • A little art to ease you into the weekend

    https://efisoul63.wordpress.com/2019/04/02/francesco-del-cossa-allegory-of-april-triumph-of-venus/

    A post that is a little easier to digest than some of the others that I have posted this week.

    Eli writes some good posts on a variety of topics but I don’t think a lot of people get to see them. Therefore I’m doing my bit so that more people learn from her wisdom.

    Hope you all had a good week

    Angela

    Another SA reblog because I couldn’t help it

    http://sententiaeantiquae.com/2019/04/08/on-reading-and-writing-for-pleasure/

    I love reading these posts about the Ancient Greek literature as you get the real deal. It’s not lost any authenticity due to translation so it’s the closest you can get to being in Ancient Greece itself.

    Have you read any works of literature in the original language?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    To be like everyone else or not? – Reblog

    https://quirkydragon.wordpress.com/2019/04/08/to-be-or-not-to-be-mainstream/

    This is another blogger who has some quality posts to read. This is again long but worthy of your attention when you get the time.

    I’ve only just come across this blogger but I’m sure there will be many more posts that will interest me in the future.

    Another inspiring blogger

    http://breakawayindividual.com/2019/04/05/breakaway-individuals-throughout-history-the-individual-the-trailblazers-you/

    This is another person that I like to read as they post about intellectual topics that don’t get enough coverage on here. They are often in depth articles do you gotta be in it for the long haul.

    None of this tldr bs.

    Is there any blogs that you would personally recommend I read?

    Be well

    Angela

    The Durells

    This is good Sunday night television as it’s relaxing and idyllic. It’s set on Corfu in the 1930s. It features Greek conversation between the natives but also Lesley Durrell.

    Sometimes you just need something that isn’t intellectual to practice on. The speech isn’t very distinct but there are subtitles to help. Normal speech tends to be quick and you only catch the most accented words. This can be problematic so going with the gist can be useful since this is only for enjoyment. However, the problem comes when you need to put this into real life. I will hopefully get better this year but as I’ve learnt this isn’t something you can rush. It happens at its own pace.

    Do you have any tips that you use to increase your foreign language learning abilities?

    Αντιο

    Αγγελικα

    The difference between written and spoken language

    http://sententiaeantiquae.com/2019/04/07/the-difference-between-dialogues-and-letters/

    I rather liked this post because while I can be quite pedantic when it comes to written language; I’m not always quite so when it comes to speech. I can of course be informal in writing and formal in speech if the occasion commands it.

    Do you have any such conventions in your language?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    Ελευθείρα!(Freedom)

    https://www.pappaspost.com/freedom-enduring-greek-ideal-on-greek-independence-day/

    For those of you that don’t know about Greek Independence Day I thought I would share a post to illuminate you on this issue. This subject tends to get missed out from history classes. I love history and have therefore researched it quite a lot but it wasn’t until I really started to learn the language and the culture from visiting that I started to understand its importance. I have written many posts about Greek language, culture and history on my other blog athenaminerva7@wordpress.com and now I’m continuing this trend on here. I’m trying to be more focused with the personal and autistic posts on my first blog and the Greek related posts on here.

    I have also neglected to post a schedule as I try to post during the week and have a break during the weekend but it appears that I’m reaching far more people by posting every day. Once again Cristian Mihai is proving he knows his onions not just with his “just punch the damn keys”. Getting your posts in front of more eye balls and keeping your name in people’s mind is vitally important. When you gain traction, capitalise on it as it’s so very difficult to regain growth if you have slacked off for whatever reason. I know this is tough but we love it and that’s why we do it.

    How do you overcome your struggles with productivity?

    Wishing you all well

    Angela

    The music of Ancient Greece

    https://aeon.co/videos/music-was-ubiquitous-in-ancient-greece-now-we-can-hear-how-it-actually-sounded

    Since today is Greek Independence Day I thought I would share a post about the importance of music in Greek history.

    For a taste of more modern Greek music see here Rebetika.

    Have you any stories to share about what is important in your culture?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    Brexit: The uncivil war

    In a follow up article to the one I previously wrote on Brexit and Grexit; I have just watched Brexit: The uncivil war. It’s a brilliant show which shows exactly how Brexit happened.

    I love Benedict Cumberbatch as he is such a talented actor. I adore the erudite way he speaks and acts. His intellect is phenomenal. No matter his role he is utterly convincing.

    Now having learnt about Brexit from both sides, what is your opinion on the matter?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    How to deal with the torture of your own mind

    http://cristianmihai.net/2019/03/10/heaven-or-hell-now-or-later/

    Once again Cristian Mihai has managed to out do himself and wrote the most amazing blog post ever. Sometimes I feel like he knows me and my life which is impossible as we’ve never met and I doubt we ever will. At times he knows exactly what is on my mind which is extraordinarily difficult even for myself. He has a very good way with words. He is able to present his points in a much more user friendly approach than I can. Maybe because he is not English but I do write how I talk. I am a thesaurus Hahahaha.

    Comments? Questions?

    Best wishes

    Angela

    Comparing and contrasting Brexit (2016) and the Greek Referendum (2015)

    I’ve just been watching Inside Europe: 10 years of turmoil and it documents in its 3 programs :-

    First the immediate background leading up to the momentous decision that is Brexit,

    Second the events around the Greek financial bailouts or Grexit as some reports named it and

    Lastly the refugee crisis that came to dominate the headlines and the entirety of Europe.

    Therefore I decided to write an opinion piece as I have spent a considerable amount of time in both Greece and England over the last 10 years along with visiting places like Morocco, Canary Islands, Italy, Denmark and America.

    Brexit

    Britain leaving the European Union has been debated for a long time before we were given the chance to decide whether we still wished to be part of it. I wasn’t around when we first joined the eu but from what I have heard, there was a great debate over that too.

    I think it’s part of us being an island that makes us so insular and so reject a closer union with our neighbours.

    This video debates languages but has references to the British attitude to being closer to Europe.

    British people are notoriously cold and I believe it’s not only our weather that makes us like this but our traditions as well. This is why we are reluctant to have any closer ties to what can colloquially called “Johnny foreigner”. This is a rather outdated concept but responsible for a lot of the anti immigration feeling that led to Brexit. If you analyse the statistics you will find that it is older people and people from the heartlands of the uk who voted for Brexit. This is almost like trying to put the milk back in the bottle after you have spilled it. It can’t be done but if you try to risk contaminating the rest of the milk.

    Brexit reminds me of Pandora’s box as we have allowed all of the contents out yet in our efforts to close the box and attempt to go back to the way things were, we have left hope trapped inside.

    Nothing good can come of us returning to a place we last
    inhabited in the 1970s. The world has changed too much and we all know we were sold a pack of lies as to the benefits of Brexit. The daily news relates each new case of a business quitting because of uncertainty surrounding the rules that are going to be in place and the trade deals that will be used to help enforce these new criteria.

    Grexit

    The Greeks on the other hand are in some ways still in the 1970s as you can here the way they spoke then if you go past a cafe (kafenon) and listen to the old men chatting.

    Greece is a place that still has traditional values which can seem to some rather backward because mental health is not a buzz word nor is gender identity or trans rights. These are all good things but they are not splashed all over the media. People have common sense so they don’t need to have an oppressive stance to get across to them that these sections of the community need respect. They are private people who get on with their lives and don’t worry about the opinions of others. They don’t follow fashion as they know it changes so quickly and they don’t have the income to keep up with that.

    The Greeks are very hard working and you can find studies online which show how they work the most but this not sufficient to prosper in today’s society. You need to work in a profitable way and this is often the opposite of the humane way.

    This is why the Greeks rebelled against the austerity measures as you can only take so many cuts before its impossible to continue. They changed their government to elect members who would vote against anything more from the Germans. So understandably they were not happy that when their prime minister Alexis Tsipras gave them a referendum and they rejected it by 61% which is a lot more decisive than 52%. However their PM decided to ignore “the will of the people” as Teresa May is so fond of calling it as he needed to remain in Europe. He like all Greeks likes money and will do what is necessary to ensure a constant supply of it.

    We could do the same as the Greeks as I think they set a precedent there but no, we have Teresa May saying Brexit means Brexit means Brexit. What actually does that mean?

    Immigration

    Is it that we can’t cope with immigrants? We didn’t have the same number flooding in from Syria that the Greeks had to deal with. Admittedly we are the final destination unlike Greece being the first stop but the English are famous for being monolingual and our European counterparts are multilingual. This means we have a limited way in terms of thinking and connection. We are inflexible and not open to other avenues simply because they don’t exist for us. We cannot comprehend there way of life so they cannot integrate into ours. There will forever be a distance culturally, ethically and linguistically.

    I wrote a follow up to this and here is the link to it :- Brexit: The unholy war

    What do you all think of this situation? Please let me know by writing in the comments below.

    Best wishes

    Angela

    Aristotle Valaoritis 1824-1879 Lefkadian Poet

    https://greatestgreeks.wordpress.com/2018/10/15/aristotelis-valaoritis/

    This Reblog goes into great detail about the life of the man Aristotle Valaoritis Lefkadian National Library

    Aristotle Valaoritis Lefkadian National Library
    Aristotle Valaoritis National Library
    Aristotle Valaoritis National Library

    who wrote the Greek national anthem. He also wrote many poems. If you want to see where he born Aristotle Valaoritis birth plaque

    Aristotle Valaoritis birth plaque

    there is this plaque on the wall in Lefkás town commemorating the spot. He later lived on the island of Madouri Madouri by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

    Madouri by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

    near Lefkás you will find a shrine dedicated to him. Aristotle Valaoritis Shrine by Wilhelm Dörpfeld

    Aristotle Valaoritis shrine by Wilhelm Dörpfeld
    Aristotle Valaoritis shrine

    His family still live in the area and are going to stay there forever. Even Aristotle Onassis with all his money and charm couldn’t persuade them to sell their land. This is what Wikipedia has to say about the matter. Aristotle Valaoritis

    He also has a statue dedicated to himself with a lengthy description in Lefkás town. Aristotle Valaoritis statue

    Aristotle Valaoritis statue
    Aristotle Valaoritis tomb, Lefkás Town
    Aristotle Valaoritis tomb, Lefkás Town
    Angelos Sikelianos poem on Aristotle Valaoritis tomb
    Angelos Sikelianos poem on Aristotle Valaoritis tomb

    This is the first of my series of posts on famous Greek but mainly Lefkádian poets. With a bonus post on Sappho from Sententiae Ancientae.

    C F Cavafy,

    Angelos Sikelianos,

    Lefkadia Hearn,

    George Seferis

    C G Karyotakis

    Ioannis (Nanos) Valaoritis

    Odysseus Elytis

    Andreas Emberikos

    Kostis Palamas

    Ioannis Zampelios

    Spiridon Zampelios

    Other series include Greek authors, Painters, Rural villages in Lefkás and Foreigners who have become interested and or benefited Greece in some ways. These can all be found here Series links.

    Do you have any favourite poets? Drop me a line so we can discuss in the comments.

    Hope your enjoying yourself,

    Angela

    How learning foreign languages enables connection

    This video contains the quote from Nelson Mandela where if you speak to a person in a language they understand it goes to there head but if you speak to them in their language it goes to their heart. This is so very true of the Greek people and inside the speaker Louka will detail his journey to connect with his heritage but also the indigenous people of Australia. He will empower you to learn a language for yourself if only to keep your brain healthy and stop neurodegenerative diseases from taking hold and destroying all that you hold dear.

    Wishing you all well.

    Angela

    Word origins

    Now the origins of words is a subject that I love dearly so I’m very grateful when a native Greek not only teaches me many but also provides the translations for me in my native language. So very useful and helpful to have these around.

    I didn’t realize until watching the videos a second time just how many words had entered from French, Italian and Turkish. French as I’m learning was such a popular language in Europe and in Russia in the 18th. It was the lingua Franca or universal language of its day.

    I do have an affinity for certain words and I did wonder when going into a bakers why a particular type of bread was mia fragiola parakalo (one loaf of fragiola bread please). Now I know it’s a word of Turkish origin as it does stick out from the rest of the language. As does karpousia or watermelons. One of the very first words I learnt and it’s not really even Greek!!!!

    Here is the first video in the series

    Basic Greek

    This the second video in the series

    The effect Greek has had on English

    Wishing you all luck in your language adventures

    Angela

    The influence Greek has had on the English language etc

    Now I have previously commented lots on the many things contained within this video so I thought for a change you would like to see a Greek talk about his own language and history. He goes into much greater depth about everything than I ever could. Pronunciation is the biggest factor here. Its useful for those learning Romance languages and Russian too as there all connected.

    Here is the link to the first video in this series if you missed it.

    Basic Greek

    This is the third in the series in case you wish to jump ahead.

    More complex Greek

    Enjoy the bounty contained within.

    Angela

    Mythos by Stephen Fry

    I’ve been reading his retelling of the Greek myths and there even more fascinating that I expected. Most of us are raised on them so we know the principal gods and some of the adventures they got up to. This contains how all the different gods, goddesses, Titans, titanesses, nymphs, dryads and every other creature came to be. It gives their family tree, the stories of their birth and what they were responsible. It also explains how we get many of our words and how these words are also still present in the Greek language today. It’s written in a very amusing way that you would expect but also an intellectual one. A student of history or classics will love this just as a person studying languages, art, philosophy or just Greece and its people in general. It just goes to show that facts are forever reinterpreted by different cultures but that doesn’t stop them from being true. Or being based on real life events that previously we may have doubted since there only record was in religious texts. This is the best book I’ve read for a long time and I would most certainly recommend it.

    The effect of accents on language

    When you start delving into languages and linguistics you find that each language has its specific sounds. This means that it can be extraordinarily difficult to lose your native accent or to perfect a second language etc. This shouldn’t worry you too much if you have tried your best. It can in fact be a very attractive feature and one that sets you apart. Secure people like something that makes them different like a usp in products. However if there insecure they will seek to eliminate this facet of themselves and want to blend in completely.

    One shouldn’t hide from their native accent or language. Many people sound completely different when they are speaking the languages that they know. This reflects there personality but also the experiences they have had when using that language. It showcases the values and attitudes of a culture too. Which is why people can act in a completely different manner depending on which way of life is currently in control. I have seen it happen and it’s fascinating to behold. If you haven’t come across this yet, there are polyglots who do exaggerated versions on YouTube. Or for more realistic versions check out videos where the person is teaching in one language and explaining in another. If your lucky, this might allow you to observe when they know English to fluency but it’s not their native language.

    Certain sounds are easier to replicate than others hence junta is difficult because although it originates from Spain there is no j sound there. In other languages that also possess no j like Greek it becomes unta as there is nothing like that word. It also describes a dark period in recent history that nobody wishes to talk about which may also have something to do with its mispronunciation.